Blessed Are…

Blessed Are…

Sermon for November 4th, 2018

The Beatitudes begin what is commonly referenced as Jesus most famous sermon. The word “beatitude” comes from the Latin <em>beatitudo</em>, meaning “blessedness.” The phrase “blessed are” in each beatitude implies a <em>current</em> state of happiness or well-being. This expression held powerful meaning of “divine joy and perfect happiness” to the people of the day. In other words, Jesus was saying “divinely happy and fortunate are those who possess these inward qualities.” While speaking of a current “blessedness,” each pronouncement also promised a future reward. But why do you think Jesus started with these? I think in order to understand all of this we have to answer the questions, what are these beatitudes? Do they spell out conditions we must meet in order to inherit eternal life? Do they celebrate the power of God in the life of the disciples? Could it be both? How do we know?

Listen to the message today and be challenged by God’s Word.

Reformation Day

Sermon for October 28th, 2018

On October 31, much of the culture will be focused on candy and things that go bump in the night. Protestants, however, have something far more significant to celebrate on October 31. It’s Reformation day, which commemorates what was perhaps the greatest move of God’s Spirit since the days of the Apostles. But what is the significance of Reformation Day, and how should we consider the events it commemorates? At the time, few would have suspected that the sound of a hammer striking the castle church door in Wittenberg, Germany, would soon be heard around the world and lead ultimately to the greatest transformation of Western society since the apostles first preached the Gospel throughout the Roman empire. Today, Luther’s legacy lives on in the creeds and confessions of Protestant bodies worldwide. As we consider his importance, let us equip ourselves to be knowledgeable proclaimers and defenders of biblical truth. May we be eager to preach the Gospel of God to the world and thereby spark a new reformation of church and culture.

Listen to the message today and be challenged by God’s Word.

Living Differently

Sermon for October 21, 2018

We have started a new series called <strong>Who are the people in your neighborhood?</strong> Most people struggle to build relationships with their neighbors. Why? What would happen if every believer in our city made an attempt to build relationships with the people in the 8 households that are closest to them? The goal of this series is to inspire and equip believers to become neighborhood catalysts that move themselves and others from; Strangers to Acquaintances, and from Acquaintances to Relationship. We need to identify “neighborhood practices” that will help us to take practical steps towards becoming great neighbors.

<strong>Week 7: Living Differently- Matthew 25:31-46</strong>

The first-century church caught the attention of the Roman Empire. But the recognition had very little to do with what the church believed. In fact, the pantheistic citizens of Rome often referred to the followers of Jesus as “godless” or “atheists” because believing in only one god seemed like a weak and anemic faith against the backdrop of the panoply of the gods of the Acropolis. Contrary to our contemporary notions of our distinctiveness being found in a set of belief statements we embrace, the attention paid to the early church had everything to do with what they did. They achieved a level of fame in the Roman Empire for the manner in which they extended mercy and care to one another and to their neighbors. Emperor Julian lamented, “It is a scandal . . . that the godless Galileans care not only for their own poor but for ours as well; while those who belong to us look in vain for the help that we should render them.” Jesus came not only to identify with people but to change their stories. To bring freedom to the prisoner, sight to the blind, and hope to the oppressed. Following Jesus requires that we put the needs of others ahead of our own; that we suspend our doubts and grab onto faith; that we trade fear of the unknown for trust in the unseen.

Listen to the message today and be challenged by God’s Word.

The Fear Factor

Sermon for September 30, 2018

We have started a new series called Who are the people in your neighborhood? Most people struggle to build relationships with their neighbors. Why? What would happen if every believer in our city made an attempt to build relationships with the people in the 8 households that are closest to them? The goal of this series is to inspire and equip believers to become neighborhood catalysts that move themselves and others from; Strangers to Acquaintances, and from Acquaintances to Relationship. We need to identify “neighborhood practices” that will help us to take practical steps towards becoming great neighbors.

Week 4: The Fear Factor -Sept 30. Luke 7:36-39 In many ways, neighboring is scarier than going downtown or even going on a global trip. Because your neighbors are always going to be there. One of the side effects of the 24 hours news phenomenon is that it can cause us to be suspicious and fearful of those we don’t know. When we turn on the TV and see and hear about all of the brokenness in our world, it shapes our world view and our view of others. “Good Fences make Good Neighbors” – We have a tendency to desire safe and clean environments. When this is lived out, it leads us to isolation. Jesus has called us to engage the messiness of relationships. Real relationships are always messy, think about your family relationships. This issue of neighboring will confront many things in our lives…how we spend our money and our time, how we view our things, and it will cause us to confront many of our fears.

Listen to the message today and be challenged by God’s Word.